Fri

26

Feb

2016

Why Shoe Lifts Are The Solution To Leg Length Discrepancy

There are two unique variations of leg length discrepancies, congenital and acquired. Congenital means you are born with it. One leg is anatomically shorter than the other. Through developmental periods of aging, the human brain senses the step pattern and recognizes some variation. Your body usually adapts by dipping one shoulder over to the "short" side. A difference of under a quarter inch isn't very excessive, does not need Shoe Lifts to compensate and usually does not have a profound effect over a lifetime.

Shoe Lift

Leg length inequality goes largely undiagnosed on a daily basis, however this condition is simply remedied, and can reduce many cases of lumbar pain.

Therapy for leg length inequality usually consists of Shoe Lifts. These are generally cost-effective, commonly being less than twenty dollars, compared to a custom orthotic of $200 if not more. When the amount of leg length inequality begins to exceed half an inch, a whole sole lift is generally the better choice than a heel lift. This prevents the foot from being unnecessarily stressed in an abnormal position.

Lumbar pain is easily the most common condition affecting men and women today. Over 80 million people are affected by back pain at some point in their life. It's a problem that costs employers huge amounts of money year after year as a result of lost time and productivity. Innovative and more effective treatment solutions are constantly sought after in the hope of reducing the economic impact this issue causes.

Leg Length Discrepancy Shoe Lifts

Men and women from all corners of the earth suffer the pain of foot ache as a result of leg length discrepancy. In these cases Shoe Lifts can be of very useful. The lifts are capable of decreasing any pain in the feet. Shoe Lifts are recommended by many certified orthopaedic orthopedists.

To be able to support the human body in a well-balanced manner, the feet have a critical role to play. In spite of that, it is sometimes the most overlooked region in the human body. Some people have flat-feet meaning there is unequal force placed on the feet. This will cause other areas of the body such as knees, ankles and backs to be impacted too. Shoe Lifts make sure that the right posture and balance are restored.
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Sat

20

Feb

2016

Shoe Lifts For Leg Length Discrepancy

There are two different types of leg length discrepancies, congenital and acquired. Congenital means you are born with it. One leg is structurally shorter than the other. As a result of developmental stages of aging, the human brain senses the gait pattern and identifies some variation. Our bodies typically adapts by tilting one shoulder over to the "short" side. A difference of under a quarter inch isn't grossly uncommon, require Shoe Lifts to compensate and ordinarily won't have a serious effect over a lifetime.

Leg Length Discrepancy Shoe Lift

Leg length inequality goes mainly undiscovered on a daily basis, yet this issue is very easily remedied, and can eradicate quite a few instances of back problems.

Treatment for leg length inequality typically consists of Shoe Lifts. These are generally economical, generally being less than twenty dollars, in comparison to a custom orthotic of $200 or more. When the amount of leg length inequality begins to exceed half an inch, a whole sole lift is generally the better choice than a heel lift. This prevents the foot from being unnecessarily stressed in an abnormal position.

Upper back pain is the most common health problem impacting men and women today. Over 80 million people have problems with back pain at some stage in their life. It's a problem which costs employers huge amounts of money each year on account of lost time and production. New and superior treatment solutions are constantly sought after in the hope of lowering economical impact this issue causes.

Leg Length Discrepancy Shoe Lift

Men and women from all corners of the earth suffer from foot ache as a result of leg length discrepancy. In these cases Shoe Lifts might be of immense help. The lifts are capable of eliminating any discomfort in the feet. Shoe Lifts are recommended by countless skilled orthopaedic physicians.

So that they can support the human body in a well balanced fashion, the feet have a very important part to play. Inspite of that, it can be the most overlooked zone of the human body. Some people have flat-feet meaning there may be unequal force exerted on the feet. This will cause other areas of the body like knees, ankles and backs to be impacted too. Shoe Lifts make sure that appropriate posture and balance are restored.
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Sat

20

Feb

2016

Curing Leg Length Imbalances With Shoe Lifts

There are two different kinds of leg length discrepancies, congenital and acquired. Congenital implies you are born with it. One leg is anatomically shorter than the other. As a result of developmental stages of aging, the human brain senses the gait pattern and recognizes some difference. The entire body usually adapts by dipping one shoulder to the "short" side. A difference of less than a quarter inch isn't very uncommon, doesn't need Shoe Lifts to compensate and commonly does not have a serious effect over a lifetime.

Shoe Lifts

Leg length inequality goes typically undiscovered on a daily basis, however this issue is easily fixed, and can reduce quite a few incidents of low back pain.

Therapy for leg length inequality usually consists of Shoe Lifts. These are generally low-priced, usually priced at under twenty dollars, compared to a custom orthotic of $200 or higher. Differences over a quarter inch can take their toll on the spine and should probably be compensated for with a heel lift. In some cases, the shortage can be so extreme that it requires a full lift to both the heel and sole of the shoe.

Lower back pain is easily the most common health problem affecting men and women today. Over 80 million men and women experience back pain at some stage in their life. It's a problem that costs companies millions of dollars year after year as a result of time lost and production. Innovative and superior treatment methods are continually sought after in the hope of decreasing the economical influence this condition causes.

Shoe Lift

Men and women from all corners of the world suffer the pain of foot ache as a result of leg length discrepancy. In a lot of these cases Shoe Lifts are usually of worthwhile. The lifts are capable of decreasing any discomfort in the feet. Shoe Lifts are recommended by many qualified orthopaedic doctors.

To be able to support the human body in a well balanced manner, your feet have got a vital part to play. Despite that, it's often the most overlooked region in the body. Many people have flat-feet meaning there may be unequal force exerted on the feet. This causes other areas of the body including knees, ankles and backs to be impacted too. Shoe Lifts make sure that suitable posture and balance are restored.
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Mon

28

Sep

2015

What Can Induce Calcaneal Spur

Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Overview

A heel spur is a calcium deposit on the underside of the heel bone, often caused by strain on foot muscles and ligaments. Heel spurs are common among athletes but also tend to develop as we age, as flexibility decreases. Heel spurs can be painful when associated with plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the connective tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot and connects the heel bone to the ball of the foot.

If left untreated, the mild aches associated with this condition can evolve into chronic pain. And as you try to compensate for the pain, your gait may change, which could impact your knee, hip and back.

Causes

The plantar fascia is a big strong ligament on the bottom of the foot, starting at the bottom of the heel bone and running into the ball of the foot. As the arch of the foot becomes weak, it sags slightly with each step and this causes the plantar fascia to tug and pull at the heel bone with each step. Over a period of time, a spur forms where this big strong ligament tugs and pulls at the heel bone. Soon, inflammation (swelling) starts around this spur and the pain becomes almost unbearable. (Sometimes heel spurs may be present without being painful if no inflammation is present).

Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Symptoms

Heel spurs may or may not cause symptoms. Symptoms are usually related to the plantar fasciitis. You may experience significant pain. Your heel pain may be worse in the morning when you first wake up or during certain activities.

Diagnosis

Because the diagnosis of heel spurs can be confused with tarsal tunnel syndrome (as described earlier), most surgeons advocate performing a tarsal tunnel release (or at least a partial tarsal tunnel release) along with the plantar fascia release. This surgery is about 80percent successful in relieving pain in the small group of patients who do not improve with conservative treatments.

Non Surgical Treatment

Heel spurs and plantar fascitis (inflammation of the plantar fascia) are usually controlled with conservative treatment. Early intervention includes stretching the calf muscles while avoiding reinjury to the plantar fascia. Decreasing or changing activities, losing excess weight, and improving the fit of shoes are all important measures to decrease foot pain. Modification of footwear includes well-padded shoes with a raised heel and better arch support. Shoe inserts recommended by a healthcare professional are often very helpful when used with exercises to increase the strength of the foot muscles and arch. The inserts prevent excessive pronation and continued tearing of the plantar fascia.

Surgical Treatment

Heel spur surgery should only be considered after less invasive treatment methods have been explored and ruled insufficient. The traditional surgical approach to treating heel spurs requires a scalpel cut to the bottom of the food which allows the surgeon to access the bone spur. Endoscopic plantar fasciotomies (EPF) involve one or two small incisions in the foot which allow the surgeon to access and operate on the bone spur endoscopically. Taking a surgical approach to heel spur treatment is a topic to explore with a foot and ankle specialist.
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Wed

23

Sep

2015

Does A Inferior Calcaneal Spur Hurt?

Posterior Calcaneal Spur

Overview

A heel spur (or osteophyte) is a small bony growth or collection of bony growths on the back or underside of the heel. They may or may not cause pain, and patients often confuse heel spurs with a related condition known as plantar fasciitis, inflammation of the band of tissue that stretches from the ball of the foot to the heel, forming the arch. Many people have bone spurs without ever knowing it, and about 70 percent of patients with plantar fasciitis who do have discomfort will also be found to have a heel spur when observed via X-ray. It is likely that a bone spur forms as the body tries to repair itself from repeated injury by laying down extra bone at the site of trauma. Plantar fasciitis is typically another result of such trauma. Heel spurs are most often seen in middle-aged men and women, but can be found in all age groups.

Causes

One frequent cause of heel spurs is an abnormal motion and mal-alignment of the foot called pronation. For the foot to function properly, a certain degree of pronation is required. This motion is defined as an inward action of the foot, with dropping of the inside arch as one plants the heel and advances the weight distribution to the toes during walking. When foot pronation becomes extreme from the foot turning in and dropping beyond the normal limit, a condition known as excessive pronation creates a mechanical problem in the foot. In some cases the sole or bottom of the foot flattens and becomes unstable because of this excess pronation, especially during critical times of walking and athletic activities. The portion of the plantar fascia attached into the heel bone or calcaneous begins to stretch and pull away from the heel bone.

Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Symptoms

Most heel spurs cause no symptoms and may go undetected for years. If they cause no pain or discomfort, they require no treatment. Occasionally, a bone spur will break off from the larger bone, becoming a ?loose body?, floating in a joint or embedding itself in the lining of the joint. This can cause pain and intermittent locking of the joint. In the case of heel spurs, sharp pain and discomfort is felt on the bottom of the foot or heel.

Diagnosis

A Heel Spur diagnosis is made when an X-ray shows a hook of bone protruding from the bottom of the foot at the point where the plantar fascia is attached to the heel bone. The plantar fascia is the thick, connective tissue that runs from the calcaneus (heel bone) to the ball of the foot. This strong and tight tissue helps maintain the arch of the foot. It is also one of the major transmitters of weight across the foot as you walk or run. In other words, tremendous stress is placed on the plantar fascia.

Non Surgical Treatment

FIRST, Reduce the acute pain. This is done by a combination of several things; injection of a synthetic relative of cortisone into the heel, a prescription of anti-inflammatory pills to reduce inflammation, physical therapy and a special heel pad. About 50% of the time, these treatments will permanently relieve the pain. In the other 50%, the pain becomes recurrent, and the treatment proceeds to Stage II. SECOND, Recurrent, painful heel spur is caused by the tug and pull of the plantar fascia ligament on the heel bone with each step. When the pain is recurrent, arch supports are made to prevent sagging of the arch. The arch supports are custom-made according to the size and shape of the feet. This prevents the arch from sagging and the ligament from tugging and pulling on the heel bone. The inflammation and pain eventually go away as the first phase of treatment is continued along with the arch supports, although the spur itself remains. THIRD, Surgery to remove the spur is possible and is usually done as Day Surgery.

Surgical Treatment

Usually, heel spurs are curable with conservative treatment. If not, heel spurs are curable with surgery, although there is the possibility of them growing back. About 10% of those who continue to see a physician for plantar fascitis have it for more than a year. If there is limited success after approximately one year of conservative treatment, patients are often advised to have surgery.
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